Emerging Context

My offering for the latest Friday Fictioneers challenge.

Copyright Sean Fallon

Out of context. Everything begins out of context. Everything begins out of context at least with respect to itself. From its own frame of reference. From its own point of view.

Out of context until something emerges to give it context. A detail. A broad stroke. A battery.

Then the context grows. The context and the emerging details grow and develop a context around the thing. At least with respect to itself. From its own frame of reference. From its own point of view. A jar.

But does the thing grow? Does the thing grow within the emerging context? The detail, the broad stroke, the battery, the jar? Or is it your understanding that grows when the context emerges? Your understanding grows but the thing does not grow. Only the context around it–the context that you understand–grows and emerges and grows. Like a battery. Like a jar. Like a brick.

The thing remains what it is. At least with respect to itself. From its own frame of reference. From its own point of view. Context grows with respect to you, not it. From your frame of reference. From your point of view.

The thing remains what it is. It is not you. You are not what it is. You know nothing of the thing apart from the growing emerging context. You know nothing about the thing. The thing itself. The thing with respect to itself. From the thing’s frame of reference. From the thing’s point of view.

A battery. A jar. A brick.

It.

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44 comments

  1. It’s so true, Rick. It touches a cause of loneliness among of persons. But does someone really know about themselves or do we know just context around ourselves? It touches a cause of loneliness inside a person.

  2. First I’d like to thank you for stopping by my blog for a quick visit… that was most kind of you and I do appreciate it. Second, I never would have found you if you had not been by. I’ll look for your books on my Nook… I’m reading like crazy right now, jumping around genres, on limited time, but I’ll put them on my list to check out! πŸ˜€

    1. Thanks for the great comment. πŸ™‚ I hope you find the books ok on the Nook. Let me know if you have any problems, and let me know what you think when you find them. I love to talk about my books! (I make them with talking about them in mind.)

      I’ll continue to keep an eye on your blog as well.

      Have a good weekend.

  3. I really love your almost stilted writing style. It’s like taking bullet points and making them coherent with the least amount of words possible, while still clearly getting your point across.

  4. You hit my page and I have been trying to get back to all those who take a look to say thank you. I do like some of your blogs, to be truthful I only read two, but I liked them both. Thanks for sharing.

  5. I don’t know if it’s only me, but I had to go through the passage twice before I could reach an actual conclusion. Great writing style! I really loved the comparison between the context and the battery. Kudos!

    1. Thanks! A joke from Faulkner: Someone asked him once what he would say to people who said they didn’t understand one of his books even after reading it three times. Faulkner said read it a fourth time. πŸ™‚

  6. Thanks for visiting my Amateur Radio Blog. I enjoy your stuff–good imagery. As to objects and such, I remember the late S.I. Hayakawa (the late semanticist) saying, “the symbol is not the thing symbolized.” There’s a grain of truth in there somewhere. Keep up the good work. Remember, it could be worse…we could be organized. Aloha from the Big Island of Hawaii!

  7. Reblogged this on Self-Publish 101 and commented:
    The thing remains what it is. It is not you. You are not what it is. You know nothing of the thing apart from the growing emerging context. You know nothing about the thing. The thing itself. The thing with respect to itself. From the thing’s frame of reference. From the thing’s point of view.

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