Becomes One Hundred Stories #25: Sees a Blue Sun

This is a piece of short fiction in the style and universe of three of my novels: Becomes the Happy Man, Becomes God’s Silent Prophet, and Becomes the Meaning Blossom.

Sees a Blue Sun

The boy wondered why the sun was blue.

The boy asked the man with the hat why the sun was blue.

The man with the hat told the boy their sun had always been blue. Had always been blue at least since he had been a boy.

The boy asked the man with the hat what color it had been before it became blue when the man with the hat was a boy.

The man with the hat said he did not know. He said the sun had been blue for as long as he could remember.

The boy said hadn’t anyone else told the man with the hat what color the sun had been before the man with the hat was a boy.

The man with the hat said as far as anyone else had said, the sun had always been blue.

The boy said how could the sky also be blue if the sun was blue.

The man with the hat said the sky was blue precisely because the sun was blue. He said anyone could see that.

The boy asked the man with the hat what color the sky would be if the sun happened to be red.

The man with the hat said red of course.

The boy asked the man with the hat what color the sky would be if they sun happened to be yellow.

The man with the hat said yellow of course.

The boy said he wasn’t sure about that.

The man with the hat said but it was obvious.

The boy again said he wasn’t sure about it.

The man with the hat again said it was obvious.

The boy said obvious things aren’t always right.

The man with the hat said like what.

The boy said the planet was obviously flat but in fact it was round.

The man with the hat asked the boy what he was talking about.

The boy repeated that the planet was obviously flat but in fact it was round.

The man with the hat said but it was flat.

The boy looked at the man. The boy thought about what to say. The boy couldn’t think of anything to say.

The man with the hat asked the boy why he said the planet was round when it was obviously flat.

The boy said he couldn’t prove it. He said he forgot the math to prove it.

The man with the hat said math didn’t prove anything.

The boy said math could prove many things. He said he had just forgotten how to do it.

The man with the hat said math only proved what those who believed in math wanted it to prove.

The boy wished he could remember what his math teacher had taught him, but he had no words to refute the man with the hat.

The man with the hat asked the boy how long he would stay on the planet.

The boy said he didn’t know.

The man with the hat asked the boy about his home planet.

The boy said he didn’t have a home planet. He said he was born in a large box that drifted among the stars.

The man with the hat asked the boy which planet had been the home planet of his parents.

The boy said he didn’t know. He said he never knew his parents.

The man with the hat said that was convenient.

The boy looked at the man with the hat.

The man with the hat asked the boy why he was looking at him like that.

The boy said because that was exactly how he felt about it, but most beings he met seemed to think it a tragedy.

The man with the hat said most beings are that way.

The boy asked the man with the hat why he wasn’t that way.

The man with the hat said it was a long story.

The boy said the man with the hat could keep that long story to himself.

The man with the hat kept the long story to himself. Then he asked the boy if he wanted to hear a short version of the long story.

The boy said yes, if the man with the hat wanted to tell it.

The man with the hat said that he also could not remember his parents, and he had always found it to be very convenient.

The boy said it was convenient if you can get by on your own.

The man with the hat said he could get by on his own.

The boy said he could too, but he also said that he hadn’t always been able to get by on his own.

The man with the hat asked the boy how he had gotten by before he could get by on his own.

The boy said the large box took care of him and the other children until they were old enough to be sent to their destination planets.

The man with the hat said and this was the boy’s destination planet.

The boy said no. The boy said he didn’t have a destination planet. He said it was his destiny to wander around all the planets.

The man with the hat asked the boy if it was his destiny to wander around all the planets by himself.

The boy said yes.

The man with the hat said that was very convenient.

The boy said it was convenient if you could take care of yourself.

The man with the hat said he was sure the boy could take care of himself.

The boy said he had taken care of himself since he had been sent away from the large box that drifted among the stars.

The man with the hat said the boy would soon need help for things that he could not take care of himself. He said that would happen when the boy became a man.

The boy said he would worry about that when it happened.

The man with the hat said he had a daughter that was about the boy’s age.

The boy said that was very convenient.

The man with the hat said it was convenient if the boy needed help for things that he could not be able to take care of himself as a man.

The boy said he was not yet a man and he didn’t have a hat and he didn’t need any help.

The man with the hat said that was very convenient.

The boy said yes it was.

The man with the hat asked the boy where he was going.

The boy said away.

The man with the hat said away where.

The boy said to find out why the sun was blue.

The man with the hat told the boy to return and tell him when he found the answer.

The boy said he didn’t think he would return that way again.

The man with the hat asked why.

The boy said he only visited places once and then moved on.

The man with the hat said that was very convenient.

The boy said the man with the hat didn’t know the half of it.

To read more stories in the series, see the Becomes One Hundred Stories page.